The Biblicial Response to Loss Through the Story of Job - Teliah NaShonia

The Biblicial Response to Loss Through the Story of Job

 
 
 

Responding to tragedy has never been easy. Maybe it’s the terrible loss we feel. Perhaps it’s the desire to know why our losses leave us feeling alienated and alone. Was it something we did? Was it someone else’s fault? Why did God allow it to happen? These questions often go unanswered. For many of us, as we make moral inventories and dig up the layers of denial within our hearts and lives, we realize that our suffering has resulted from our own behaviors. But in Job’s case, this wasn’t necessarily true. He was a godly man with a very healthy family relationship. He was willing to honestly examine his life but could find no failures or deficiencies.

 
When Job lost everything:
 
His wealth
His family
His perfect health
 
The question of WHY was appropriate.
 
Yet, considering this Job did not sin by blaming God.
 
Let’s be honest, the majority of the time when tragedies plague our lives. The reactions we have are the opposite of Job. Instead of continuing to glorify God in our tragedy like Job did. We find ourselves becoming extremely frustrated, worried, angry, depressed, discouraged, and desperate.
 
We even start complaining about our tragedy to anyone that will listen.
 
But, we need to be reminded that right after Job lost everything he owned, he also lost his good health.
 
Why was this happening to such a good person like Job?
 
From Job’s lifestyle were told;
 
“There was a man named Job who lived in the land of UZ. He was blameless, a man of complete integrity. He feared God and stayed away from evil ( Job 1:1).”
 
and shown
 
“Every year when Job’s sons had birthdays, they invited their brothers and sisters to join them for a celebration. On these occasions, they would get together to eat and drink. When these celebrations ended and sometimes lasted several days, Job would purify his children. He would get up early in the morning and offer a burnt offering for each of them. For Job said to himself, “Perhaps my children have sinned and have cursed God in their hearts,” This was Job’s regular practice ( Job 1:4-5).”
We can clearly see that Job loved God and desired to lead his children to do the same.
 
Yet, his suffering resulted from the discussion between God and Satan;
 
Job’s First Test.
“One day the angels came to present themselves before the Lord and Satan the Accuser came with them.” Where have come from?” the Lords asked Satan. And Satan answered the Lord, “I have been going back and forth across the earth, watching everything that’s going on.” Then the Lord asked Satan, “Have you noticed my servant Job? He is the finest man in all the earth, a man of complete integrity. He fears God and will have nothing to do with evil.” Satan replied to the Lord, “Yes, Job fears God, but not without good reason! You have always protected him and his home property from harm. You have made him prosperous in everrythi8ng he does. Look how rich he is! But take away everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face! “All right, you may test him, the Lord said to Satan. “Do whatever you want with everything he possesses, but don’t harm physically.” So, Satan left the Lord’s presence ( Job 1:6-12).”
 
Job’s second Test.
“One day the angels came again to present themselves before the Lord and Satan the Accuser came with them. “Where have you come from?” the Lord asked Satan. And Satan answered the Lord, “I have been going back and forth across the earth, watching everything that’s going on.” Then the Lord asked Satan, “Have you noticed my servant Job?  He is the finest man in all the earth, a man of complete integrity. He fears God and will have nothing to do with evil. And he has maintained his integrity, even though you persuaded me to harm him without cause.” Satan replied to the Lord, “Skin to skin, he blesses you only because you bless him. A man will give up everything he has to save his life. But take away his health, and he will surely curse you to your face!” All right, do with him as you please,” the Lord said to Satan. “But spare his life,” So, Satan left the Lord’s presence, and he struck Job with a terrible case of boils from head to foot (2:1-7).”
 
As we see from the story of Job, we must understand that we will face countless tragedies in our life. But, we need to understand that as our emotions are being tested, God is working within our spiritual realm; to bring us to a point of self-examination.
 
God wants to expand our understanding and give us the proper perspective to continue life.
This means that our emotions cannot be attached to our possessions.
 
Do you ever get caught in this trap, building your sense of self-worth on your spouse, children, or on what you own, your home, cars, jobs or wealth?
 
If those things were taken away, how would you react?
 
Simply put, our self-esteem must be based on the fact that God loves us so much that he sent his son, Jesus, to die for us while we were sinners (Romans 5:8). God’s love can never be taken away from us. As a result, any person who has suffered a serious loss will never fully understand why such a catastrophe happens. A common element of suffering is a loss of perspective. No, matter how hard we try to maintain our point of view, it’s difficult to separate yesterday’s celebrations with today’s devastation. But, it’s so comforting to know that God, who loves us more than we can even imagine, will always be there when we need him. Most importantly, if we are willing to trust God and put our life in his powerful hands, a balanced restoration can take place as it did in Job’s life.
 
 
 
During a tragedy, will you be honest with your emotions and allow God to restore whatever you have loss?

 

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3 thoughts on “The Biblicial Response to Loss Through the Story of Job

  1. It's so interesting that you're writing this at this time! I was lead to read 1st Peter this week, which is all about sharing in Christ's suffering but also remaining blameless/full of integrity in our walk with God no matter how we're persecuted. As you wrote, Job is an amazing example of that. Thank you for the reminder!

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